Your search results

L Street Power Station Historic Timeline

L Street Power Station Historic Timeline

Today, you know it as the Edison Power Station, a familiar landmark on the South Boston skyline. But for years, the power station had remarkable influence over the New England area, home to some of the most technologically advanced generators in the country. By the mid-1960s, it was the largest generating power station operating in a six-state area. While the power station may be closed today, the character of the buildings on the site remain, and we plan to preserve what we can to keep the station’s history alive for all of South Boston residents to enjoy.

 

Timeline

1903
7

Edison Electric Illuminating Company built a new turbine hall alongside the original power station on L Street.

1904
2

The new turbine hall was designed as a showcase for the power station’s generators which at the time were among some of the most technologically advanced in the country.

1942
7

Over the course of 38 years, 12 turbine generators were installed as the power station continued to expand, increasing power supply throughout Greater Boston.

1960
2

In the early 1960s, a new modern power station was constructed on the existing site, establishing the New Boston Generating System, which included the addition of the candy-pink structure seen on site today.  By 1967, New Boston Generating Station had become the largest generating power station operating in a six-state area.

1998
7

Sithe Energies Corporation acquired the power station from Boston Edison.

2002
5

Sithe Energies Corporation sold the power station to Exelon Power Corporation.

2006
3

The power station stopped providing any meaningful source of power to the New England area.

2016
2

Exelon Power Corporation sold the power station to a partnership of Hilco Global and Redgate Real Estate. Today, Redgate, Hilco and their consultants have begun an interactive engagement process with the South Boston community as they work to shape a plan for the redevelopment of the site that embraces the site’s historic and industrial past while reintegrating the site with the neighborhood.